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  • Q&A with Australian Health Practitioners

    What can I do to manage severe bruising after fall on knee?

    5 days ago I fell down a bashed my left knee and caused immediate bruising and swelling I put ice on it for about 20 min. then had to go for a drive for about 1:45hours where I notice my swelling worsen and now my whole leg is severely bruised and swollen x-ray shows no broken bones but the swelling and bruising still remains and would like to know if I should do anything else to help with this. thank you
  • Find a professional to answer your question

  • 4

    Thanks

    Dr James Rohrsheim

    Orthopaedic Surgeon

    Nothing beats simple old ice and compression.

    Sounds like you have done a number on yourself!

  • 3

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    Anonymous

    I did the ice and compression its now been over 3 weeks now and I still have brusing and swelling and burning pain.  I guess time to get it checked out.  thanks

  • 3

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    Fred Saleeba

    Massage Therapist, Myotherapist

    Fred Saleeba is a Clinical Myotherapist, who has a keen eye for postural alignments and specialises in shoulder pain, tension & injury. Fred primarily sees … View Profile

    Ice and Compression is the best self treatment, but if you find it fails to reduce, Manual Lymphatic Drainage is good to help assit the lymphatic system for a quicker recovery

  • 1

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    Anonymous

    hi it is still swollen and brused what is manual lymphatic drainage is this something I can do or do I need to see a therapist for this.  Thanks. 

  • 5

    Thanks

    Fred Saleeba

    Massage Therapist, Myotherapist

    Fred Saleeba is a Clinical Myotherapist, who has a keen eye for postural alignments and specialises in shoulder pain, tension & injury. Fred primarily sees … View Profile

    Lymphatic Drainage (Massage),is a technique done by a therapist. There are a few self techniques that help encourage the lymphatic system, although I honestly have not found them overly helpful.

    Lymphatic Drainage is a soft and gentle technique that simply aids the lymphatic system in doing its job, which is to remove excess fluid from tissues. It is very effective for cases such as yours where bruising & swelling is not going down. Usually it reduces after 1 or 2 sessions of Lymphatic Drainage.

    If you are interested, I can around for therapist around your area. Where abouts are you located?

  • 4

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    Elaine Stevenson is the lead practitioner and founder of a Mosaic Myotherapy, a (manual medicine) practice which draws together knowledge of epidemiology and population health and … View Profile

    The 'Australian Lymphology Association' is the peak body for practitioners who are trained in Manual Lymphatic Drainage.  Their members comprise individuals from a variety of backgrounds, physiotherapy, nursing, occupational therapy,  and massage therapy.  You should be able to locate them easily via one or other of the internet search engines.

    As with all things however, where symptoms are still troubling you significantly even after a few weeks have passed, it's best to return to your GP (or practitioner who ordered the initial xray that you described above). They'll be able to examine you further to determine whether additonal imaging and/or medication are perhaps required.  They'll also be able to advise whether additional treatment, eg manual lymphatic draining as outlined here, might be helpful. 

  • 2

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    Dr. Aaron Albrecht works at Body Wise Chiropractic in Bibra Lake, Western Australia. The clinic is located within a gym, and Dr. Albrecht is the … View Profile

    Hi, it may be a good idea to get checked by a biomechanical specialist such as a chiropractor, osteopath, or physiotherapist. In some cases where you have fallen directly onto the 'front' of the knee (the lump at the front of the shin bone just below the knee, known as the tibial tuberosity) you can sustain damage to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) when the tibia slides backwards relative to the femur. Your treatment provider may administer tests such as the 'posterior drawer test', or 'Lachman's test' to assess the integrity of the structure. If there are other concerns involving the meniscus, they may provide other orthopaedic tests such as 'Thessaly's test'. If any or all of these return a positive finding for injuries to the cartilage or ligaments, an MRI would be advised to assess the extent of the damage.

    Feel free to contact me if you have further questions, and if you are in the Fremantle region of Western Australia, I'd be happy to check things for you, as I have a direct referral system with a knee specialist.

    Regards,

    Dr. A

  • 4

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    Dr Matthew Hartley

    Orthopaedic Surgeon

    Dr Hartley specialises in surgery of the hip and knee. He is also an advanced trauma surgeon treating all fractures (breaks) of the upper and … View Profile

    Hi Aaron,

    Just a quick correction.  An ACL rupture is usually caused by a severe twisting injury to the knee or a hyper-extension injury.  A high energy fall onto the tibial tubuerosity can result in a POSTERIOR cruciate ligament injury (PCL).  The Posterior Draw Test is also for a PCL injury.  The Lachman's test is for an ACL injury.

    Regards,

    Dr Matt Hartley.

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