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  • Q&A with Australian Health Practitioners

    Are Weetbix (Sanitarium) low GI?

    I have just discovered I am insulin resistant and am trying to instigate weight loss by concentrating on low GI foods. I currently alternate unsweetened oat porridge with Weetbix.
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    Arlene is a registered practising dietitian, with a private practice in the Eastern Suburbs of Sydney, and has built a strong business over the last … View Profile

    The GI is a ranking of carbohydrate foods from 0 to 100 based on how quickly and how much they raise blood sugar levels after being eaten. This is related to how quickly a carbohydrate containing food is broken down into glucose.

    Low GI foods produce a slower, lower rise in blood sugar levels. High GI foods produce a faster, higher rise in blood sugar levels.

    Low GI foods have a GI of less than 55 Medium GI foods have a GI between 55 and 70 High GI foods have a GI greater than 70 

    Why is the GI important? Considering the GI of carbohydrate foods can help with good diabetes management as:  

    • Lower GI foods produce lower, more stable blood sugar levels and therefore can help improve control of diabetes.

    • Higher GI foods produce higher, faster rising blood sugar levels. 

    • Lower GI foods also help you to feel fuller for longer, which can help to control appetite and assist with weight management.

    Weetbix when eaten with milk has a GI of 47. It is acceptable to eat it as an alternative to rolled oats.

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