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  • Q&A with Australian Health Practitioners

    Can I still eat fruit if I have type 2 diabetes?

    I'm worried about the fructose contents in fruit that could affect my blood sugar. Anyone know about this?
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  • 3

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    Courtney Bates

    Dietitian, Nutritionist

    Courtney is an Accredited Practising Dietitian (APD), Accredited Nutritionist (AN) and member of the Dietitians Association of Australia (DAA). She runs her own practice on … View Profile

    Yes! All adults should be aiming to eat 2 serves of fruit everyday. This includes Type 2 diabetics.

    You are right that fruits (with the exception of berries, lemons and limes) have carbohydrate which will affect your blood sugar level. To put this in perspective, a whole apple has the same carbohydrate as a slice of bread. The good news is most fruits are low glycaemic index.

    Nutritional goals for diabetics include spreading the carbohydrate intake throughout the day, choosing low glycaemic index carbohydrates and avoiding foods high in saturated fat. In order to spread carbohydrates out throughout the day, I find clients find it easier to have fruit as a snack midmeals rather than with meals, to avoid eating too many carbohydrates at any one time. Limit your fruit to 1 serve at a time midmeals. 1 serve = 1 medium piece of fruit (e.g. apple), 2 small pieces of fruit (e.g. apricots, mandarins), 1 cup canned/ chopped fruit, 1 tbsp sultanas/ raisins, 20 grapes.  

    Courtney Dinnerville
    Accredited Practising Dietitian

  • 2

    Thanks

    Denise Burbidge

    Dietitian, Nutritionist

    Denise is an Accredited Practising Dietitian working in private practice in Melbourne, and consulting to aged care facilities throughout Victoria. Denise has a particular interest … View Profile

    I agree with the posting above. Fruits are an important part of healthy eating and are encouraged for all people, those with and those without, diabetes. Aim for 2 serves per day as large quantities of fruits (especially in one sitting) may result in high sugar levels.
    To be extra cautious choose fresh fruits and limit fruits preserved in added sugars and syrups.

    Denise Burbidge APD
    The Food Clinic
    www.thefoodclinic.com.au

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