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  • Q&A with Australian Health Practitioners

    Why don't antidepressants work on me?

    I have been prescribed three different antidepressants over the course of my depression and none of them seem to work. I read online that they affect people differently and sometimes are ineffective. Is it possible that medications simply will not work on me? What other treatment options do I have?
  • Find a professional to answer your question

  • Leanne Hall

    Clinical Psychologist, Psychologist

    Integrative Psychologist, Health Coach & Personal Trainer in private practice. I have expertise in assessing and treating a range of disorders and conditions; depression, anxiety, … View Profile

    Selecting the right medication is a case of trial and error. However, when you begin taking any medication, it is important to take it at the same time every day (following the advice given by your GP/Psychiatrist). It takes several weeks for SSRI/SNRI antidepressants to take effect, and often you begin noticing negative side effects before the positive effects begin to kick in. This is normal.
    However if anti-dpressants still don't seem to be working for you,  I would encourage you to discuss your concerns with your prescribing doctor. It may be that your diagnosis needs to be reviewed, and perhaps a second opinion sought?  

  • 2

    Thanks

    My research interests include immunology and the mechanisms of amyloid formation. The latter has implications for people who are dealing with Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease … View Profile

    I agree with Leanne about talking with your prescribing doctor about this.

    As she says, matching the “right” antidepressant to the “right” person is often a matter of trial and error - there are many different classes of them (with different pharmacological modes of action) so finding one which is effective for a particular person can take time.

    All the best.

  • 3

    Thanks

    Alpana Baruah

    Clinical Psychologist, Psychologist

    I am a Clinical Psychologist. I believe in providing care which is responsive to the individual needs of my clients to promote their psychological wellbeing. View Profile

    Other treatment options include therapy. Therapists often use a blended approach combining various approaches of therapy such as interpersonal therapy, cognitive behaviour therapy and psychodynamic therapy. A GP mental health care plan allows you to access 10 medicare rebated sessions per calender year with a Psychologist/Clinical Psychologist.

  • Anonymous

    Have you tried natural Medicines?
    Go to your local health food store and ask for Coconut oil. Must be the high quality extra virgin Bottle. It has helped me with my anxiety and depression and works almost instantly. 

  • 1

    Thanks

    My research interests include immunology and the mechanisms of amyloid formation. The latter has implications for people who are dealing with Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease … View Profile

    I can't find anything in the professional databases (PubMed, etc) which suggests that coconut oil, regardless of whether it is "high quality extra virgin" (whatever that means) or not is of any benefit to people who are dealing with depression or anxiety.

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