Verify your email address to receive email notifications.

Verification sent. Please check your inbox to verify your address.

Unable to send verification. Please try again later.

Get information from qualified health professionals on the COVID-19 Coronavirus.
  • Q&A with Australian Health Practitioners

    How does diet influence my blood sugar levels?

  • Find a professional to answer your question

  • 1

    Thanks

    Arlene is a registered practising dietitian, with a private practice in the Eastern Suburbs of Sydney, and has built a strong business over the last … View Profile

    As a diabetic it is essential that you manage your blood sugars. After all, keeping your blood sugar level within your target range can help you live a long and healthy life. You are obviously not educated in what makes your blood sugar level rise and fall – food is central to this, particularly carbohydrate containing foods.
    Healthy eating is a cornerstone of any diabetes management plan. But it's not just what you eat that affects your blood sugar level. How much you eat and when you eat matters, too. Keeping to a regular schedule of eating can work to your advantage. This does not work all the time, but it is essential that it works most of the time. Your blood sugar level is highest an hour or two after you eat, and then begins to fall. But this predictable pattern can work to your advantage. You can help lessen the amount of change in your blood sugar levels if you eat at the same time every day, eat several small meals a day or eat healthy snacks at regular times between meals.
    Ideally every meal should be well balanced. As much as possible, plan for every meal to have the right mix of starches, fruits and vegetables, proteins, and fats. It's especially important to eat about the same amount of carbohydrates at each meal and snack because they have a big effect on blood sugar levels. Talk to your doctor, nurse or dietitian about the best food choices and appropriate balance. Eat the right amount of foods, particularly carbohydrates (eg. fruit, bread, pasta, rice). Learn what portion size is appropriate for each type of food. Simplify your meal planning by writing down portions for the foods you eat often. Use measuring cups or a scale to ensure proper portion size.
    You must coordinate your meals and medication. Too little food in comparison to your diabetes medications — especially insulin — may result in dangerously low blood sugar (hypoglycaemia). Too much food may cause your blood sugar level to climb too high (hyperglycaemia). Talk to your diabetes health care team about how to best coordinate meal and medication schedules.

answer this question

You must be a Health Professional to answer this question. Log in or Sign up .

You may also like these related questions

Ask a health question
Community Sponsor(s)
Community Contributor

Empowering Australians to make better health choices