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  • Q&A with Australian Health Practitioners

    What can cause bone and joint pain?

  • Find a professional to answer your question

  • Anthony Short

    Podiatrist (General)

    Anthony Short BAppSc(Pod) MPod hold both Bachelor and Master level degrees in podiatry, and works in private practice, hospital and educational positions within Brisbane. His ... View Profile

    Joints are the connections between two bones, and they are covered in glistening, shiny, and smooth articular hyaline cartilage. In this pristine condition, joints do not hurt, and in fact articular cartilage itself has no blood vessels or nerve endings.
    However, damage to the cartilage can occur through two main mechanisms; progressive wear and tear and injury (osteoarthritis), or through systemic or auto-immune conditions (eg rheumatoid arthritis). This then leads to pain in the structures that surround the joint, such as the synovium, joint capsule and subchondral bone plate.
    Arthritis is a leading cause of disability worldwide, and determining the type of arthritis you have, via medical imaging or blood tests, guides you on the prognosis and treatment options.

    Bone pain, in the absence of injury (ie a fracture or break in the bone) may be due to mechanical stress (for example shin splints) or other systemic health conditions. Bone pain in the absence of trauma, particularly in children, should never be ignored as it may be a symptom of bone cancer in rare instances.

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  • Dr Adam Wild

    Chiropractor

    I studied at Macquarie University completing both Bachelor and Master degree's. While there I was the Vice President of MUCSA (Macquarie University Chiropractic Students Association) ... View Profile

    Joint pain and bone pain can be caused by many different lifestyle factors. It can depend on how much we do or do not exercise, the types of work that we do; whether we are using heavy lifting, bending, twisting or too much sitting. If you are experiencing joint or bone pain, it is a good idea to follow up with your local healthcare practitioner such as your local chiropractor.

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