Please verify your email address to receive email notifications.

Enter your email address

We have sent you a verification email. Please check your inbox and spam folder.

Unable to send verification, please refresh and try again later.

  • Q&A with Australian Health Practitioners

    Do naturopath's help treat Crohn's disease?

    I am very into alternative medicine and natural therapy. Is it worthwhile to see a naturopath for Crohn's?
  • Find a professional to answer your question

  • 3

    Thanks

    Chris Fonda

    Dietitian, Nutritionist, Sports Dietitian

    As an Accredited Sports Dietitian, APD and athlete (springboard diver), Chris has both professional and personal experience in sport at the sub-elite and elite level.Chris … View Profile

    In my experience many naturopaths recommendations are not supported by scientific evidence and evidence-based practice. Alternative therapy commonly replaces conventional medicine which is not recommended. Instead you may like to try complementary therapies (used in conjunction with conventional medicine) to help with your Crohns.

    Its best to seek the expert advice from an Accredited Practising Dietitian (APD) who specialises in gastrointestinal diseases such as crohns disease and ulcerative colitis. APDs are able to provide you with evidence-based dietary recommendations specific for people with your condition. To find one near you head to www.daa.asn.au

  • Anonymous

    Hi just read your reply to this I have Ulcerative Colitis and I have seen a few dietitions I recently been doing fodmap diet but only symptom it helped me with was bloating and flatuance, and sadly I am flaring again.  how does a dietitician work out what I should or not eat when I have tried a recommended diet but it hasn't helped.  I would love to hear what suggestions you recommend or how to determine a good diet plan.  thanks

  • 4

    Thanks

    Chris Fonda

    Dietitian, Nutritionist, Sports Dietitian

    As an Accredited Sports Dietitian, APD and athlete (springboard diver), Chris has both professional and personal experience in sport at the sub-elite and elite level.Chris … View Profile

    Good morning!

    It's important to remember that at this stage, there is no evidence to show that diet can "cure" GI diseases such as UC. I wish there was! Diet can certainly assist in the management of symptoms and this is most likely why your dietitian put you on a low FODMAP diet to assist with reducing the bloating and gas your were experiencing. There may be justification for looking into natural food chemicals which you may like to discuss with your dietitian.

    Dietary treatment is very different during a "flare up" compared to when it is in remission. The main aim of dietary treatment during a flare up is to prevent malnutrition, correct any electrolyte imbalances, nutrient deficiencies and to stablise weight. A high protein/high energy diet that is low in dietary fibre can assist by helping to nourish the body and, rest the bowel.

    During remission or the "non-flare up" stage, a healthy, well balanced diet is recommended. This ensures your body is getting all the nutrition it needs (inlcuding antioxidants, omega-3 fatty acids to assist with lowering inflammation). Some studies have been done into probiotics effect at inducing remission and preventing "flare ups" however, the research isn't quite robust enough at this stage to recommend routinely. Probiotics have been shown though to have limited adverse effects so you could discuss which strain to take with your dietitian.

    You must also remember that everyone is individual and what works for you may not work for others so try and work through your individual needs with your dietitian as it can be a bit of trial and error to get it right. The benefits of having a dietitian is that they can ensure you get all your nutrition.

    I hope that's answered your question. Please understand that in this forum, it's difficult to give individualised advice.

answer this question

You must be a Health Professional to answer this question. Log in or Sign up .

You may also like these related questions

Ask a health question

Empowering Australians to make better health choices