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  • Q&A with Australian Health Practitioners

    Should I have my gall blader removed?

    I have had one attack and have multiple stones. Is it best to have the gall bladder removed?
  • Find a professional to answer your question

  • 1

    Thanks

    Karen Griffin

    Healthshare Member

    I had my gallbladder removed in February 2011 and have had nothing but problems since.  I have had five proceedures done since and am still suffering from endless nausea.  Obviously my body has reacted badly to having my gallbladder removed.  I had up to 15 stones and had some horrific attacks prior to it's removal.  If I had of had a choice I would have never had it removed but I suppose eventually the attacks get so severe you have no choice.  Good luck.

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  • 1

    Thanks

    Anonymous

    Is there anything that gave you any relief my mother had her gall removed  almost 4 weeks ago and is still constantly vomiting. All tests and scans are clear

  • Dr Jason Wong

    Bariatric (Obesity) Surgeon, General Surgeon, Laparoscopic Surgeon, Upper GI Surgeon (Abdominal)

    Jason Wong is a Laparoscopic GI Surgeon with expertise in gallbladder, hernia, endoscopic pilonidal, bariatric, antireflux and emergency general surgery. NO GAP for major health ... View Profile

    Has your mother had a gastroscopy performed?

    Usually, there is no physiological or anatomical reason why removing the gallbladder should cause vomiting.

    It would be important to know when she is vomiting, what brings it on, whether it is related to food or not, how soon after eating she vomits, what comes up when she vomits, what medication she is taking, other medical problems.  Also whether she is in any pain or not.

    There are many things that can cause vomiting and it is very important when patients have persistent vomiting, to understand the exact nature of it.

    Regards,

    Dr Jason Wong

    www.yoursurgeon.org

  • 3

    Thanks

    Dr Jason Wong

    Bariatric (Obesity) Surgeon, General Surgeon, Laparoscopic Surgeon, Upper GI Surgeon (Abdominal)

    Jason Wong is a Laparoscopic GI Surgeon with expertise in gallbladder, hernia, endoscopic pilonidal, bariatric, antireflux and emergency general surgery. NO GAP for major health ... View Profile

    As a specialist gallbladder surgeon, my usual recommendation is that if a patient has gallstones and is experiencing pain or has experienced pain, then surgery would be recommended.

    Because your gallbladder has multiple stones and you have had an attack, I guarantee that if the gallbladder is removed that when looked under the microscope the gallbladder will show signs of chronic cholecystitis - or chronic inflammation of the gallbladder.

    The result of long-standing low-grade chronic inflammation of the gallbladder can be a shrunken contracted gallbladder which can make surgery more difficult when it eventually needs to come out.

    Depending on what other medical problems you may have, where you live, what sort of travelling you do, that may make it more or less important for you to have your gallbladder removed.

    Complications of gallstones can include an inflamed gallbladder (acute cholecystitis), gangrenous cholecystitis, pancreatitis (which can be life threatening), jaundice from gallstones escaping from the gallbladder and becoming lodged in the main bile duct, bile duct infection known as cholangitis (which can be life threatening), erosion of gallstones into a main bile duct or bowel.  All of the complications of gallstones can be serious and in general, the morbidity of having a gallbladder removed is usually very low or minimal.  The majority of people will NOT have any problems after surgery.

    Kind regards,

    Dr Jason Wong

    www.yoursurgeon.org

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