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  • Q&A with Australian Health Practitioners

    How do you lose the extra weight gained during menopause?

    Hi,
    I have a family friend who has been going through menopause for about 3 years now and during this time she has gained 5kg. She has been going to great lengths to lose this extra weight by strict calorie counting (1200 calories), healthy eating and daily exercise (walking with weights, light jogging). What are some things that she could change/add in order to lose a the extra kilos?
  • Find a professional to answer your question

  • Jessica Webb

    Exercise Physiologist

    I guess that this point is that I really hate the word diet. So to lose belly fat, it's all about general nutrition, reduced calories, reducing your sugar content, and reducing your processed food content. Eating natural foods, so lots of fruits and vegetables, natural proteins, avoiding fried foods, and obviously making sure you are drinking plenty of water.
    Obviously there is a few hormonal changes to consider whilst going through the menopause. In general terms, the nutrition should be the same. It is all about energy in versus energy out.

  • 1

    Thanks

    Arlene is a registered practising dietitian, with a private practice in the Eastern Suburbs of Sydney, and has built a strong business over the last … View Profile

    When you hit menopause your metabolism slows down. As you get older, you may notice that maintaining your usual weight becomes more difficult. In fact, the most profound weight gain in a woman's life tends to happen during the years leading up to menopause (perimenopause). Weight gain after menopause isn't inevitable, however. You can reverse course by paying attention to healthy-eating habits and leading an active lifestyle. The hormonal changes of menopause may make you more likely to gain weight around your abdomen, rather than your hips and thighs. Hormonal changes alone don't necessarily trigger weight gain after menopause, however. Instead, the weight gain is usually related to a variety of lifestyle and genetic factors. For example, menopausal women tend to exercise less than other women, which can lead to weight gain. In addition, muscle mass naturally diminishes with age. If you don't do anything to replace the lean muscle you lose, your body composition will shift to more fat and less muscle — which slows down the rate at which you burn calories. If you continue to eat as you always have, you're likely to gain weight. For many women, genetic factors play a role in weight gain after menopause. If your parents or other close relatives carry extra weight around the abdomen, you're likely to do the same. Sometimes, factors such as children leaving — or returning — home, divorce, the death of a spouse or other life changes may contribute to weight gain after menopause. For others, a sense of contentment or simply letting go leads to weight gain. There's no magic formula for preventing — or reversing — weight gain after menopause. Simply stick to weight-control basics:

    • Move more. Aerobic activity can help you shed excess pounds or simply maintain a healthy weight. Strength training counts, too. As you gain muscle, your body burns calories more efficiently — which makes it easier to control your weight. As a general goal, include at least 60 minutes of physical activity in your daily routine and do strength training exercises at least twice a week. If you want to lose weight or meet specific fitness goals, you may need to increase your activity even more.
    • Eat less. To maintain your current weight — let alone lose excess pounds — you may need about 200 fewer calories a day during your 50s than you did during your 30s and 40s. To reduce calories without skimping on nutrition, pay attention to what you're eating and drinking. Choose more fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Opt for lean sources of protein. Don't skip meals, which may lead you to overeat later.
    • Seek support. Surround yourself with friends and loved ones who'll support your efforts to eat a healthy diet and increase your physical activity. Better yet, team up and make the lifestyle changes together.
    The bottom line? Successful weight loss at any stage of life requires permanent changes in diet and exercise habits. Take a brisk walk every day. Try a yoga class. Trade cookies for fresh fruit. Share restaurant meals with a friend. Commit to the changes and enjoy a healthier you!

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