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  • Q&A with Australian Health Practitioners

    What causes bedwetting?

  • Find a professional to answer your question

  • Dr Michael Cohen, Chiropractor is co-founder of the Chirosports Group one of Australia's leading groups of Chiropractors working together since 1994. Dr Michael Cohen Chiropractor … View Profile

    From a Chiropractic perspective we regularly find that interference in nerve flow can be the cause of bedwetting.  This is not always the case, but, there are many cases that we treat where the issue is improved and resolved by identifying and reducing nerve flow interference.  When we talk about nerve flow interference we are in simple terms referring to brain messages travelling through the nervous system to manage voluntary and involuntary actions.  Sometimes in children and adults areas in joints may become tight or even locked, reducing the good flow of these messages from the brain.  We call this a subluxation.  Sometimes in children who bed wet, we find that there are areas in the neck and back region that are tight, even though the child is generally not experiencing any apparent discomfort.  When we release these tight or locked joints with very gentle treatment, the nerve flow may improve and in a good number of cases bedwetting ceases.

    If you have not considered Chiropractoc care, I would suggest perhaps seeing a Chiropractor with a special interest in treating bedwetting and children.  If you are in Sydney, you may want to see Dr Felicity Young, Chiropractor.

    All the best,
    Michael Cohen, Chiropractor

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    Aphrodite Zoitas is a qualified Psychologist specialising in Educational and Developmental Psychology. She has experience in working with children, adolescents and their families to provide … View Profile

    There are many possible causes of bed wetting. Children who wet the bed have difficulty waking up to go to the toilet when their bladder is full.In some children, their bladder is smaller or ‘irritable’ and holds less urine.Research has suggested that many children who wet the bed produce less of a hormone known as antidiuretic hormone (ADH) during sleep. This hormone normally reduces urine production during sleep. These children produce more urine during the hours of sleep than their bladders can hold. If they do not wake up, the bladder releases the urine and the child wets the bed.

    It is always important to rule out a physical problem that may be the cause of bed wetting. It is thus important to see your child's General Practitioner (GP) to rule out a physical problem. When this assessment has ruled out a physical problem, then psychological intervention can be implemented. One treatment which has a good success rate is the bell-and-pad method. 

  • Dr David McIntosh

    Ear Nose and Throat (ENT) Surgeon

    David McIntosh is an Australian trained ENT surgeon with international experience. His areas of interest are paediatrics, nose and sinus disease, and providing access to … View Profile

    If the child snores then this needs to be managed in its own right. Many children will stop bed wetting as a bonus. 
    www.entspecialists.com.au

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