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  • Q&A with Australian Health Practitioners

    How can I get my child to stop bedwetting??

    My daughter is 7 years old and still wetting the bed from time to time! She says she has dreams where she is on the toilet adn doesn't realise she is wetting the bed until half way through! How can I help her stop this?
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    Thanks

    Dr Michael Cohen, Chiropractor is co-founder of the Chirosports Group one of Australia's leading groups of Chiropractors working together since 1994. Dr Michael Cohen Chiropractor … View Profile

    Bedwetting is a common issue in children, and it may in some circumstances be helped by seeing a Chiropractor.  In some cases bedwetting can be the result of nerve interference in messages from the brain that travel through the spinal cord providing for communication between the brain and all parts of the body.  Sometimes these nerve messages are unable to get to their destination due to interference or what we call a subluxated joint.  In the case of bedwetting this communication breakdown can sometimes be the source of the problem.  Perhaps see a Chiropractor who has a special interest in looking after children with these issues.  If you are based in Sydney you may want to see Dr Felicity Young.  A Chiropractor will assess your child and identify if nerve intereference is the issue and with gentle treatment, usually without any discomfort for the child this interference can be addressed.

    All the best,
    Michael Cohen, Chiropractor

  • Bruni (Brunhilde) Brewin

    Counsellor, Hypnotherapist

    Bruni Brewin is President Emeritus of The Australian Hypnotherapists’ Association (AHA), the oldest and largest National Registration Body for hypnotherapists in Australia founded in 1949, … View Profile

    7 years of age is normal for some children to still be wetting the bed. I had this same problem as a child.   I just wasn't very good at waking up, and I would have the same problem as your daughter.  Very frustrating for a parent.  For some, bedwetting is still a problem at the age of 15. 

    I suggest that you give hypnosis a try.  Because our subconscious mind does not differentiate between real and imaginary situations. (Even sports people use hypnosis to enhance their performance.)

    A hypnotherapist can run through the visualisation of the subconscious knowing when the bladder is full, and ringing an imaginary alarm bell to wake the person before the bladder needs to empty. You then are able to run them through getting up, going to the toilet and coming back to bed to snuggle up in a dry bed. Couple that with Ego strengthening, of how good it feels... how proud she feels being so grown up and being able to wake up now etc. etc.  You are able to re-run this outcome at a subconscious level to create a new habit.

    There may also be an emotional content that is able to be released.  You can imagine the feelings of the child having wet the bed and being embarrased by this.  None of her friends have this problem and they stay at friends places or go to overnight school excursions, where your daughter doesn't want to go incase there is an accident.  If we are fearful of having an accident, that fear becomes a reality - after all, I have failed so many times before.

    Its the same principle, having failed an exam because you didn't study for it - you can study all you like and know your topic inside out - but when sitting the exam again, you become fearful that you will fail again, and often you do.  In life we mostly get our expectancy.  You have to change that expectancy to pass with flying colours.

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