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  • Q&A with Australian Health Practitioners

    What is obesity?

  • Find a professional to answer your question

  • Rebecca Charlotte Reynolds, PhD (Dr Bec) Personable and ethical registered nutritionist (RNutr) and lecturer at UNSW Australia in lifestyle and health. Regular consultant to the … View Profile

    Great definitions and info here:
    http://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/bhcv2/bhcarticles.nsf/pages/Obesity

    :) Dr B

  • Chloe graduated from Flinders’ University in 2008 and has since worked as a Dietitian in clinical, community and private practice, and as a university lecturer. … View Profile

    The World Health Organisation defines obesity as ‘abnormal or excessive fat accumulation that presents a risk to health’.

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    Thanks

    Arlene is a registered practising dietitian, with a private practice in the Eastern Suburbs of Sydney, and has built a strong business over the last … View Profile

    An obese person has accumulated so much body fat that it might have a negative effect on their health. If a person's bodyweight is at least 20% higher than it should be, he or she is considered obese. If your Body Mass Index (BMI) is between 25 and 29.9 you are considered overweight. If your BMI is 30 or over you are considered obese.

    The BMI is a statistical measurement derived from your height and weight. Although it is considered to be a useful way to estimate healthy body weight, it does not measure the percentage of body fat. The BMI measurement can sometimes be misleading - a muscleman may have a high BMI but have much less fat than an unfit person whose BMI is lower. However, in general, the BMI measurement can be a useful indicator for the 'average person'.

     

     

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