Verify your email address to receive email notifications.

Verification sent. Please check your inbox to verify your address.

Unable to send verification. Please try again later.

Get information from qualified health professionals on the COVID-19 Coronavirus.
  • Q&A with Australian Health Practitioners

    Are depression and insomnia connected?

    My partner suffers from depression and finds it really difficult to get to sleep at night, often i wake up in the morning to find he is on the couch watching TV or asleep on the couch after struggling to fall asleep. Is this related to his depression?
  • Find a professional to answer your question

  • 1

    Thanks

    Dr Louise Shepherd

    Clinical Psychologist, Psychologist

    I am a clinical psychologist with 15 years experience working with all sorts of goals and issues. I love working with people, helping them to … View Profile

    It must be tough for both of you! Being very depressed and living with someone is who very depressed are both pretty difficult. 

    Sleep difficulties are indeed part of a depressive episode. This might be having trouble getting to sleep, staying asleep or waking early in the morning. For some unlucky people it may involve all three difficulties and sleep can be severely disrupted.  And unfortunately we can also develop bad sleep habits - such as sleeping on the couch in a desperate attempt to catch up. 

    Is your husband already getting help? If so it would be good to let his treating professional know about the sleep problems. If not perhaps some gentle encouragement to talk to his GP or see a clinical psychologist would be a sensible idea. 

    If your husband is reluctant to get help some other things that might help…..exercise and doing stuff (sounds very professional I know) have been found to be enormously helpful for depression. By doing stuff I mean getting out and doing things that usually he enjoys, going out for a movie or coffee or swim or wahtever it is that he would be doing if he wasn't feelign so low. And it may be good to set small goals to start with so that he has a positive experience…….for someone who is very depressed it might be walking around the block rather than walking their usual 5km. 

    Sorry I may be rambling now :-). Good luck and take care!

answer this question

You must be a Health Professional to answer this question. Log in or Sign up .

You may also like these related questions

Ask a health question

Empowering Australians to make better health choices