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  • Q&A with Australian Health Practitioners

    Why do I suddenly feel so depressed?

    Recently a girl who lived near my parents committed suicide. I do not know her neither does my family. However, since I have heard about her death, I have been thinking more and more about doing it myself. I heard that she climbed a tree, took all her meds, slit her wrists and hung herself. Seems easy enough to do. I take 60mg of Cymbalta daily. The one thing holding me back is my 13 month old baby boy. I could not leave him as he is just too beautiful and I don't want him to be without a mum. I am so confused. I don't want to do anything around the house and am operating on auto pilot. When I go out in the car I think of driving off the road, but bubs is with me in the back seat. People will miss me. People will blame each other. I need help to get the thoughts out of my head and to get back on track. What do I do?
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    Damien Haines

    Clinical Psychologist, Psychologist

    Damien Haines is a registered Clinical Psychologist who brings a warm and empathetic approach to therapy. He emphasises engagement in the world and encourages clients … View Profile

    It really sounds that you need help ASAP. It also sounds that you need something more than Cymbalta.

    Please talk to your GP about a suicide prevention plan. Ask your GP about community mental health teams, private psychiatric hospitals (if you have private health) and a psychologist you can talk to regularly.

    From what you have written, I cannot stress how important it is to seek help immediately.

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    lostgirl

    HealthShare Member

    As a follow up, I have been to see my GP yesterday and he has put me under watch from my husband.  My Cymbalta has been upped to 120mg per day until I can see my psychiatrist next Thursday afternoon.  The GP also advised that if I get worse over the next week to go back to him, or present myself to the nearest hospital for assessment.  I thought like previous episodes that this would go away but it has not.  I am just thankful that I am aware that my mind can play up on me and that in no way would I act out and harm myself or my family.

  • Damien Haines

    Clinical Psychologist, Psychologist

    Damien Haines is a registered Clinical Psychologist who brings a warm and empathetic approach to therapy. He emphasises engagement in the world and encourages clients … View Profile

    Great, it sounds like you are making active decisions about your welfare. I would also add to your plan Lifeline's number (13 11 14) and visit their web site for additional supports in your area

    http://www.lifeline.org.au/Find-Help/Lifeline-s-Service-Finder/Lifeline-Service-Finder/default.aspx

    They also have an iPhone app with this information should you have that type of phone. Also like I said seek out your local mental health team, grab their number and maybe have a chat even if you are no longer suicidal, just to familiarise and make that potential phone call feel a lot safer.

    It also sounds like at the moment you could do with some good psychological assistance from a psychologist. You should be able to access this through Medicare (need a referal from your GP and make an extended appointment with them). A list of some psychologists is here

    http://www.psychology.org.au/findapsychologist/

    Again. You've made a great start, keep those plans rolling out so you can rebegin to engage in the life you would like.

    All the best

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    Muzzabun

    HealthShare Member

    Personally I was on cymbalta as well but it seem to have no effect. Thoughts of suicide lead to thorough planning of how to do it. I had just lost my mother and the thought of leaving dad alone was what stopped me. The day after my attempt my gp got me in to see a phyciatrist. It was an amazing feeling to finally have someone say I understand and mean it. He pulled me from the brink and put me on strong meds which had an effect nearly immediately. Been on them for 8 months now and I am getting better. One day at a time. This is your time to be selfish. Look after number one first. Don't be ashamed of how you feel. You are not alone or crazy. Confide in your closest friends. You don't have to do it alone. My heart goes out to you. Yours sincerely John.

  • Bruni (Brunhilde) Brewin

    Counsellor, Hypnotherapist

    Bruni Brewin is President Emeritus of The Australian Hypnotherapists’ Association (AHA), the oldest and largest National Registration Body for hypnotherapists in Australia founded in 1949, … View Profile

    It was very nice of you to share your story and give hope to someone else.  Thank you for that.

  • Bruni (Brunhilde) Brewin

    Counsellor, Hypnotherapist

    Bruni Brewin is President Emeritus of The Australian Hypnotherapists’ Association (AHA), the oldest and largest National Registration Body for hypnotherapists in Australia founded in 1949, … View Profile

    There is light at the end of the tunnell.  Sometimes it may be a reaction to something earlier then the scenario you mentioned.  There are a lot of things that go on in the world that accumulate and make things seem worse.

    When someone commits suicide, they are absorbed in their feelings, and their 'thinking mind' is to one side not involved in what is going on.  When that happens they don't think about the consequences.

    You have thought about that which is really great.  And you are doing something about it, which is even greater, because it tells me that there is a strong part inside you that will help you to see this through.

    But the fact is that you are feeling very vulnerable right now, so you have to be very aware of your thinking to make sure that when you are feeling suicidal thoughts or you can feel yourself getting very sad and depressed, that you make a promise to yourself and take your GP's advice to let someone know, so that they can help you over that thinking.

    Wishing you a speedy recovery.

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