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  • Q&A with Australian Health Practitioners

    How do I know if im eating the right quantity?

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  • Arlene is a registered practising dietitian, with a private practice in the Eastern Suburbs of Sydney, and has built a strong business over the last … View Profile

    Australian portions are too large so we have become accustomed to eating too much. Your meal should consist of protein (meat, chicken, fish, eggs. lentils), carbohydrate, veges and salad. Serving sizes vary per person, gender, activity level. You should only eat until you are comfortably full never feeling bloated. Eat slowly and chew your food. It takes 20 minutes for the message to get from your stomach to your head that you have had something to eat.
    Approximate serving sizes:
    Meat 100g
    Fish 150g
    Chicken 120g
    2cups of salad and veges at a meal
    2 weetbix
    Cheese 30g
    yoghurt 200ml

    I suggest you consult a dietitian to determine the quantities you should be eating. Hunger is your best indicator that you are eating the correct quantity. If you are hungry at every meal you are probably eating the correct quantity the previous meal.

  • 1

    Agree

    Chris Fonda

    Dietitian, Nutritionist, Sports Dietitian

    As an Accredited Sports Dietitian, APD and athlete (springboard diver), Chris has both professional and personal experience in sport at the sub-elite and elite level.Chris … View Profile

    I agree with Arlene. It is different for every person and it is best to consult an Accredited Practising Dietitian (APD) who can take you through a detailed dietary analysis of your current diet and determine if it is nutritionally adequate.

    Remember to look for a dietitian with the APD credentials next to their name. They can provide you with the lastest practical dietary advice and must adhere to the Dietitians Association of Australias code of conduct and ethics as well as continually updating their nutritional knowledge through professional development courses.

    Unfortunately in Australia there is no regulation on who can call themselves a nutritionist or dietitian. The APD credential ensures you are getting the best, most accurate dietary advice.

  • Lisa Renn

    Dietitian

    Lisa is an APD with 12 years experience, specialising in helping people identify and change habits that impact negatively on their health. Inspiring change, Lisa … View Profile

    Hi there,
    genearlly speaking if you are eating enough your weight will be maintained, if you are eating too much you will be gaining weight and of course if you are eating too little you will be losing weight.

    This is quite a simplified view and you can certainly be not eating enough and not lose weight as too little food can also have a negative impact on your metabolism. (that is slowing it down)

    As the others before me have said, check in with an APD and put your mind at rest.

    Good Luck.

  • Julie Markoska

    Dietitian, Nutritionist

    I am a Sydney based Accredited Nutritionist and Accredited Practising Dietitian recognised by the Dietitians Association of Australia.I have a Bachelor of Science majoring in … View Profile

    Great answers from my colleagues above.

    You might also to have a look at the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating - it's lists the number of serves of various foods you should be having and also tells you how much is in 1 serve:
    http://www.healthyactive.gov.au/internet/healthyactive/publishing.nsf/Content/recommended-daily-servings

    The site by the Dept of Health & Aging is also quite useful: http://www.healthyactive.gov.au/internet/healthyactive/publishing.nsf/Content/recommended-daily-servings 

    Hope that helps!

    Julie
    Accredited Practising Dietitian & Nutritionist
    http://www.juliemarkoska.com.au/

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