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  • Q&A with Australian Health Practitioners

    How can I control my high anxiety and depression at work?

    I feel worse at work, if I make a mistake I start dry reaching and have to go to the toilet. I block out everything and are having more suicidal thoughts.I have to work.
  • Find a professional to answer your question

  • 1

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    My research interests include immunology and the mechanisms of amyloid formation. The latter has implications for people who are dealing with Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease … View Profile

    *All* people sometimes make mistakes at work so please don't beat yourself up about this :-).

    I suggest that you have a talk with your GP and ask him/her to give you a referral to a clinical psychologist with experience in using Cognitive Behavioual Therapy (CBT).

    CBT is *very* effective in helping people to learn how to deal with anxiety and depression issues.

    All the best.

  • kim0711

    HealthShare Member

    I see a psychologist already,what's the difference between that one and a clinical one.I had 2 psychologist come out to my home,one was a clinical.They left,and told me I had dissociative identity disorder,my psychologist is trying to find me a disent psiciotrist to deal with me.Or a support network of help,everything I'm going through never used to be this bad,I feel like I'm going nuts every day.

  • kim0711

    HealthShare Member

    I have a fear that I could have Alzheimer's as at work I constantly forget what I'm tort .Or I fight inside my head for people to conferm I'm doing the job right.My GP gave me a small questaire and she said by that ,I don't have it.My demenia is supposed to be a symptom of long term depression.It makes me so angry,it's frustrating,I have to conserntrate so hard to get anything done.

  • 1

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    Julian McNally

    Counselling Psychologist, Psychologist

    Julian McNally has practised counselling psychology since 1995. He trained in client-centered and solution-oriented approaches before discovering Acceptance and Commitment Therapy in 2003. The mindfulness … View Profile

    Hi Kim?

    If you have a good relationship with the psychologist you already see, stick with him/her. More so, if they are working with you on strategies to change what you do at work so you can deal better with these feelings - these strategies are the ‘B’ or behaviour part of CBT.  It sounds like the psychologist is doing the right thing in trying to get a psychiatrist to see you. The psychiatrist would be able to confirm or rule out the diagnosis of dissociative identity disorder.

    Obviously I can't diagnose anything via this forum, but I would comment that if you are extremely anxious - the symptoms you describe in the original question fit that bill - then you would find it difficult to absorb and retain new information.

    I do hope you can find some peace or relief soon.

    Julian

  • mandy_rose

    HealthShare Member

    Kim its part of the DID and the fractured memory. Having seperated parts inside means seperated memory also. So one may hear it and then as you switch they take the memory with them inside. As you get older more fracturing will happen (this mimics Alzeimers), and so yes it gets harder. Teamwork in a system can help combat this so one can be upfront and also awareness and connections inside help heaps so memory is shared more. 

  • 1

    Thanks

    My research interests include immunology and the mechanisms of amyloid formation. The latter has implications for people who are dealing with Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease … View Profile

    Writing as somebody who is not a mental healh professional but as somebody who is a volunteer administrator of a world-wide forum which supports people with mental health issues:

    Dissociative Identity Disorder is not common. Usually (reflecting my experience as a mental health forum admin), recovery from it needs help from a mental health professional with *a lot* of experience of working with people with that condition.

    Perhaps you could ask the members of your care team to suggest such a person?

    Best wishes.

  • mandy_rose

    HealthShare Member

    3% of Australians have DID, many live with but dont know or are not aware. I am currently training proffesionals in DID through my DID workshops hoping to reach as many as possible. 

  • kim0711

    HealthShare Member

    Hi Mandy,I've been going to the Mental health ,suiside provention department up at the University.They said they did'nt think I had DID.But I am very sick.I'm on medication to help stop all the voices I hear in my head.Since going there,I've got a little better,some days are better then others.I've been told to take it easy and not push myself,other wise I might relapse.We've worked out just enough medication to keep everything at bay.My employer does'nt like me taking to much medication as it makes me too drowsy.I've been to busy to go back to see the health team at the university after xmas.But I'm starting to need to see them again,dealing with all this on my own is'nt going to work.

  • mandy_rose

    HealthShare Member

    thats good to hear. my concern would be are the meds making you sick? is the underneath anxiety making you sick? is the medication causing blocking inside which may prolong the issues (depending on the diagnosis)
    take a look at my website and on the right hand side of the main page is a link to a lady speaks who about her inside voices
    DID is more than just voices inside.

    http://castlebythelake.ning.com

  • mandy_rose

    HealthShare Member

    I am currently in the process of moving the ‘Castle By the Lake’ Network to another network provider, please contact me if you are still interested in joining. There is a link to my email on the main page at NING.

  • mandy_rose

    HealthShare Member

    Please be aware that not all proffessionals (including psychiatrists) have a good knowledge of dissociative identity disorder.
    I was told by a psychiatrist that I did not have D.I.D because ‘I knew about it!!’ His theory was that people with D.I.D dont know they have it. RIDICULOUS. Of cos I knew about it after being made aware of it, …and then he continued to try to promote an alternative to a vitamin I was already taking.
    A member of the Health Share team has asked me to continue as a non-professional member to help with answering questions re: D.I.D

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