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  • Q&A with Australian Health Practitioners

    What is the age of onset for chronic fatigue syndrome?

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  • Jon Gamble

    Naturopath

    Jon is author of ‘Treatment of Irritable Bowel Syndrome’ and “Obstacles to Cure: Toxicity, Deficiency & Infection” - two books for CAM practitioners. He specialises … View Profile

    It is important to remember that CFS has many different causes, it is not one thing. People in their teenage years and early 20s most often get the easiest form of CHS to treat, that is post-viral. Typically it follows glandular fever or cytomegalovirus. The other type of post-infection CFS which is becoming more common is CFS derived from a tick bite infections, which can lead to Lyme disease or tick typhus - both of which can be tricky to diagnose. However, there is good treatment for both.

    People in their 30s and 40s are more likely to have a heavy metal accumulation as part of their CFS picture: most often cadmium and lead, both of which produce fatigue, ‘foggy head’ and muscle pain. These patients will need chelation to remove that heavy metal.

  • Nathan Butler

    Exercise Physiologist

    Nathan Butler is an exercise physiologist and founder of the multi-disciplinary Active Health Clinic whom specialise in chronic health especially Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, orthostatic intolerance … View Profile

    Whilst I agree that CFS is multi factorial and of different origins, the causes you have mentioned above are not scientifically backed. There is no literature or evidence to show that CFS is caused by tick bites or heavy metal accumulation, this is pure speculation. From experience those who have chelation treatment often are worse post treatment.
    More robust research is needed into the cause and triggers for CFS but until then it is important to follow the research and evidence base.

    www.activehealthclinic.com.au

  • 1

    Thanks

    Amy Clissold

    HealthShare Member

    "People in their teenage years and early 20s most often get the easiest form of CHS to treat, that is post-viral.“
    Really?? How many people in their teens & early 20's with ME/CFS have you managed to successfully treat??
    Because I first developed ME/CFS when I was 14, & I'm now 28, still suffering with it, as are many of the young people I have met over the years, all of which appear to have a much more severe case than older sufferers, & it's generally been the younger sufferers who have died as a result of having ME/CFS…. So I'd hardly say we have the ”easiest form“ of ME/CFS to ”treat"…..

  • Nathan Butler

    Exercise Physiologist

    Nathan Butler is an exercise physiologist and founder of the multi-disciplinary Active Health Clinic whom specialise in chronic health especially Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, orthostatic intolerance … View Profile

    The age of onset for CFS varies significantly, some people report fatigue for as long as they can remember. In our clinic we have treated people from the age of 8 to 75 however the majority of people we treat fall between the ages of 16-40. Literature shows that generally people presenting with CFS, 2/3rds are female and 1/3rd are male.

    www.activehealthclinic.com.au

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