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  • Q&A with Australian Health Practitioners

    Is sugar bad for you?

    Related Topic
    Are all types of sugar bad for you? I've read that honey for example is a better type of sugar to have in your diet? Is all sugar bad and how can we moderate the amount of sugar we eat?
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  • Arlene is a registered practising dietitian, with a private practice in the Eastern Suburbs of Sydney, and has built a strong business over the last … View Profile

    Honey is like liquid sugar with a few trace elements. Certain honey types, eg Manuka honey are supposed to have healing powers for example if you put them on wounds. Sugar is basically empty calories - they are concentrated kilojoules with low nutritional value. Save processed sugar for occasional treats or special occasions and keep the portions small. This includes sugary items such as honey, jam, sweetened canned fruit, jellies, ice cream, soft drinks, milk flavourings, chocolates and lollies. Excess sugar can also romote tooth decay. If you do have a sweet tooth, try healthier, less kilojoule laden options:
    Choose fresh fruit for desserts and snacks.
    Beware of hidden sugar in cordials, soft drinks, cakes, pastries and sweet biscuits. Limit intake of choclates, lollies and other sweets.
    Check the laves of your favoutie foods - if sugar or sucrose is the first ingredient listed, the food is high in sugar.
    Do you hav sugar in yur tea and coffee? This can add up over the day!

  • Chris Fonda

    Dietitian, Nutritionist, Sports Dietitian

    As an Accredited Sports Dietitian, APD and athlete (springboard diver), Chris has both professional and personal experience in sport at the sub-elite and elite level.Chris … View Profile

    You may be aware of the recent “sugar bashing” in the media on popular news shows such as A Current Affair and Today Tonight. What's important to remember here is that our brain and central nervous system needs sugar (glucose) to function properly, without it, we would die.

    I don't like to put negative connotations on foods as we all need to develop a healthy relationship with food. Not all sugar is bad for us, eating whole-grain breads, cereals, rice, pasta, couscous, quinoa fresh fruit and vegetables provide our bodies with the glucose it needs.

    As a nation, we need to cut down or eliminate the “processed” foods that are generally high in sugar but, also high in saturated fat. These foods include; cakes, biscuits, pastries, sausage rolls, pies, crisps, soft drinks, ice-cream, chocolate, and confectionary.

    The Dietary Guidelines for Australians recommend a diet that limits the consumption of food and drink that contains “added sugar” and to choose more wholesome foods that have been minimally modified or processed.

    Having said this food is there to be enjoyed, make sure you eat everything in “moderation” and include a wide variety of nutritious foods from all 5 core food groups everyday. Keep those “extra” foods to once a week or once a fortnight :)

    For more advice on how to cut down on “added sugars” seek the professional advice of an Accredited Practising Dietitian (APD). You can find one by logging onto www.daa.asn.au

  • Maria Nguyen

    HealthShare Member

    The only bad sugar for us is sugar in foods like cakes, pastries, chocolate, pies and etc. Sugar in fruits is actually good for you. Regarding honey if you are not allergic to you it has a lot health benefits, like it was mentioned before it is good for healing. I used honey for my anti cellulite massage. My masseus massaged my body using honey instead of lotion. It really improved my skin and decresed cellulite level on my legs.

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