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  • Q&A with Australian Health Practitioners

    What lifestyle changes can I undergo to prevent heartbun?

    Related Topic
    I know that laying down after eating and overeating may contribute to my heartburn. Is there anything else I can change/avoid doing to prevent heartburn?
  • Find a professional to answer your question

  • 6

    Thanks

    Craig Allingham

    Exercise Scientist, Physiotherapist

    Sports Physiotherapist for over 30 years, now more interested in teaching. Men's Health is my only clinical interest and not just the dangly bits. I … View Profile

    Speaking from personal experience,  I really feel your pain, here are some other observations. Excess body weight, girth beyond 95cm for blokes or 85 cm for women, stress (even short term upsets like traffic incidents, sharp words at home) and spicy foods are all risk factors.  
    Useful management strategies that don't involve medication may help you also.  For example, taking medications with yoghurt or milk rather than water (including vitamin tabs), using a teaspoon of honey (espcially Manuka honey) when the burn begins - not as good for diabetics, and learning to physically and mentally relax with deep breathing and muscle de-tensioning.
    Hope some of this is helpful.

  • 1

    Thanks

    Nikki Martin

    Speech Pathologist

    I have over 13 years experience in adult Speech Pathology and specialise in voice and swallowing problems/cancers of the face and throat. I work very … View Profile

    Changing your diet can help. Avoiding caffeine, alcohol, spicy food and acidic foods/fluids can reduce your reflux. Avoid eating/drinking for a few hours before going to bed. If those strategies don't work, medication may be needed.

    Nikki Martin
    Speech Pathologist

  • 3

    Thanks

    Richard McMahon

    Acupuncturist

    Richard McMahon is an energetic practitioner with over 12 years of experience in complementary health. Richard holds a Bachelor Degree in Acupuncture and a Diploma … View Profile

    Dietary modification to assist in maintenence of symptoms is a great start when managing reflux as mentioned above. However the underlying state of the digestive system must be addressed. Acupuncture can be utilized to strengthen the digestive functions and when combined with herbal medicine works very well most of the time.  You would likely need weekly treatments to start but most times reflux can be maintained with 4-6 weekly intervals once under control.

    If you can take ginger here is a simple recipe as a general digestive tonic.
    Place a small saucepan with 12grams of fresh sliced ginger and 1 1/2 cups of water onto the stove. Bring to the boil and then simmer for 10 minutes. Strain and add a teaspoon of good quality honey to the tea and sip warm.

  • Craig Allingham

    Exercise Scientist, Physiotherapist

    Sports Physiotherapist for over 30 years, now more interested in teaching. Men's Health is my only clinical interest and not just the dangly bits. I … View Profile

    Me again. More thoughts on this - I recalled a post on my blog a while back titled ‘Drink, Chew, Breathe’ in which I outline strategies for pacing the arrival of food in your stomach. This allows time for flow through rather than back up to reduce reflux and acid burn on your lower oesophagus, which if allowed to persist may alter the cells and lead to a Barrett's Oesophagus.

    To read the full post, go to http://craigallingham.com/?p=599

    All the best.

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