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  • Q&A with Australian Health Practitioners

    What are the signs or symptoms of oral thrush?

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  • Women's Health Queensland Wide provides free health information for Queensland women. View Profile

    Thrush or Candidiasis is caused by the overgrowth of yeast-like fungi called Candida. Candida inhabits the vagina, mouth and digestive tract in small numbers and is normally harmless. When the balance of naturally occurring organisms in the vagina is disrupted an overgrowth of Candida can occur. Thrush can develop as a result of the use of antibiotics, oral contraceptives or steroids. It is also more prevalent in those with diabetes, multiple sclerosis, a weakened immune system, a history of allergies or who are pregnant. Thrush does not appear to be sexually transmitted. There are however numerous sexually transmitted infections that can be spread by unprotected oral sex. It is always wise to use condoms. If not you should mention this to your Dr. when you have your routine sexual health screen

    Symptoms of oral thrush include creamy white patches in the mouth that may be red and raw underneath the white coating. Other symptoms can include; red and painful areas in mouth, sore red splits at each side of the mouth, dry mouth and sometimes taste changes
    Brenda
    Women’s Health Educator
    Health Information Line, Women’s Health Queensland Wide

    Women living in Queensland can also call our Health Information Line - a free information and referral service for Queensland women - on 3839 9988 or 1800 017 676 (toll free outside Brisbane).

    Please note that all health information provided by Women’s Health Queensland Wide is subject to this disclaimer

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